Naturalism Bibliography

 

Working Bibliography (Last updated in December 2012)

Ahnebrink, Lars. The Beginnings of Naturalism in American Fiction: A Study of the Works of Hamlin Garland, Stephen Crane, and Frank Norris with Special Reference to Some European Influences 1891-1903. 1950. New York: Russell and Russell, 1961.

Becker, George, ed. and introd. Documents of Modern Literary Realism. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1963.

Bloom, Harold, ed. American Naturalism. Philadelphia: Chelsea House, 2004.

Boeckmann, Cathy.  A Question of Character: Scientific Racism and the Genres of American Fiction, 1892-1912.  Tuscaloosa: U of Alabama P, 2000.

Campbell, Donna M. Resisting Regionalism: Gender and Naturalism In American Fiction, 1885-1915. Athens: Ohio University Press, 1997.

Campbell, Donna M. “The ‘Bitter Taste’ of Naturalism: Edith Wharton’s the House of Mirth and David Graham Phillips’s Susan Lenox.” Twisted from the Ordinary: Essays on American Literary Naturalism. Ed. Mary E. Papke. Tennessee Studies in Literature (Tstl) Number: 40: U of Tennessee P, Knoxville, TN Pagination: 237-59, 2003. xv, 416.

Civello, Paul. American Literary Naturalism And Its Twentieth-Century Transformations : Frank Norris, Ernest Hemingway, Don Delillo. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1994.

Conder, John J. Naturalism in American Fiction: The Classic Phase. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1984.

Cowley, Malcolm. “‘Not Men’: A Natural History of American Naturalism.” Kenyon Review (1947). Rpt. in Becker 429-451.

Davis, Cynthia J. “Teaching ‘the Yellow Wall-Paper’ in the Context of American Literary Realism and Naturalism.” Approaches to Teaching Gilman’s “the Yellow Wall-Paper” and Herland. Eds. Denise D. Knight and Cynthia J. Davis. Approaches to Teaching World Literature (Atwl) Number: 76: Modern Language Association of America, New York, NY Pagination: 166-73, 2003. xvii, 198.

Demastes, William W. Beyond Naturalism: A New Realism in American Theatre. New York: Greenwood P, 1988.

Dow, William. “Performative Passages: Davis’s Life in the Iron Mills, Crane’s Maggie, and Norris’s Mcteague.” Twisted from the Ordinary: Essays on American Literary Naturalism. Ed. Mary E. Papke. Tennessee Studies in Literature (Tstl) Number: 40: U of Tennessee P, Knoxville, TN Pagination: 23-44, 2003. xv, 416.

Den Tandt, Christophe. The Urban Sublime in American Literary Naturalism. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1998.  Includes chapters on Howells’s Hazard of New Fortune, Dreiser’s Sister Carrie, Norris’s The Octopus and The Pit, and Jack London’s The Valley of the Moon.

Dudley, John. A Man’s Game: Masculinity and the Anti-Aesthetics of American Literary Naturalism. Tuscaloosa, AL : U of Alabama P, 2004.

Edwards, Tim. “Oppressive Bodies: Victorianism, Feminism, and Naturalism in Evelyn Scott’s the Narrow House.” Twisted from the Ordinary: Essays on American Literary Naturalism. Ed. Mary E. Papke. Tennessee Studies in Literature (Tstl) Number: 40: U of Tennessee P, Knoxville, TN Pagination: 289-303, 2003. xv, 416.

Elbert, Monika M. “The Displacement of Desire: Consumerism and Fetishism in Mary Wilkins Freeman’s Fiction.” Legacy: A Journal of American Women Writers 19.2 (2002): 192-215.

Fleissner, Jennifer L. “The Work of Womanhood in American Naturalism.” Differences 8.1 (Spring 1996): 57+.

Fleissner, Jennifer L.. Women, Compulsion, Modernity: The Moment of American Naturalism. Chicago, IL : U of Chicago P, 2004.

Furst, Lilian R. “‘Hunting for the Real’: Responses to Art in Edith Wharton’s Custom of the Country.” Twisted from the Ordinary: Essays on American Literary Naturalism. Ed. Mary E. Papke. Tennessee Studies in Literature (Tstl) Number: 40: U of Tennessee P, Knoxville, TN Pagination: 260-75, 2003. xv, 416.

Gerber, Philip. “Whither Naturalism?” Twisted from the Ordinary: Essays on American Literary Naturalism. Ed. Mary E. Papke. Tennessee Studies in Literature (Tstl) Number: 40: U of Tennessee P, Knoxville, TN Pagination: 367-89, 2003. xv, 416.

Giles, James Richard. The Naturalistic Inner-City Novel In America : Encounters With The Fat Man. Columbia, S.C. : University of South Carolina Press, 1995.

Goodling, Sara Britton. “The Silent Partnership: Naturalism and Sentimentalism in the Novels of Rebecca Harding Davis and Elizabeth Stuart Phelps.” Twisted from the Ordinary: Essays on American Literary Naturalism. Ed. Mary E. Papke. Tennessee Studies in Literature (Tstl) Number: 40: U of Tennessee P, Knoxville, TN Pagination: 1-22, 2003. xv, 416.

Graham, Don. “Naturalism in American Fiction: A Status Report.” Studies in American Fiction 10 (1982): 1-16.

Hakutani, Yoshinabu, and Lewis Fried, eds. American Literary Naturalism: A Reassessment. Heidelberg: Carl Winter, 1975.

Hapke, Laura. “No Green Card Needed: Dreiserian Naturalism and Proletarian Female Whiteness.” Twisted from the Ordinary: Essays on American Literary Naturalism. Ed. Mary E. Papke. Tennessee Studies in Literature (Tstl) Number: 40: U of Tennessee P, Knoxville, TN Pagination: 128-43, 2003. xv, 416.

Heckerl, David K. “‘Violent Movements of Business’: The Moral Nihilist as Economic Man in Jack London’s the Sea-Wolf.” Twisted from the Ordinary: Essays on American Literary Naturalism. Ed. Mary E. Papke. Tennessee Studies in Literature (Tstl) Number: 40: U of Tennessee P, Knoxville, TN Pagination: 202-16, 2003. xv, 416.

Hochman, Barbara. “Highbrow/Lowbrow: Naturalist Writers and the ‘Reading Habit’.” Twisted from the Ordinary: Essays on American Literary Naturalism. Ed. Mary E. Papke. Tennessee Studies in Literature (Tstl) Number: 40: U of Tennessee P, Knoxville, TN Pagination: 217-36, 2003. xv, 416.

Hoeller, Hildegard. “Mcteague: Naturalism, Legal Stealing, and the Anti-Gift.” Twisted from the Ordinary: Essays on American Literary Naturalism. Ed. Mary E. Papke. Tennessee Studies in Literature (Tstl) Number: 40: U of Tennessee P, Knoxville, TN Pagination: 86-106, 2003. xv, 416.

Howard, June. Form and History in American Literary Naturalism. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1985.

Joslin, Katherine. “Turning Zola inside Out: Jane Addams and Literary Naturalism.” Twisted from the Ordinary: Essays on American Literary Naturalism. Ed. Mary E. Papke. Tennessee Studies in Literature (Tstl) Number: 40: U of Tennessee P, Knoxville, TN Pagination: 276-88, 2003. xv, 416.

Kaplan, Amy. “Naturalism with a Difference.” American Quarterly 40.4 (Dec. 1988): 582+.

Kaplan, Amy.  The Social Construction of American Realism. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1981.

Kaplan, Harold. Power and Order: Henry Adams and the Naturalist Tradition in American Fiction. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1981.

Kaplan, Harold. Henry Adams and the American Naturalist Tradition. New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction, 2010.

Lawlor, Mary. Recalling the Wild: Naturalism and the Closing of the American West. New Brunswick, N. J. : Rutgers U P, 2000.

Lehan, Richard. “American Literary Naturalism: The French Connection.” Nineteenth-Century Fiction 38 (1984): 529-557.

Lehan, Richard Daniel.  Realism and Naturalism: The Novel in an Age of Transition.  Madison: U of Wisconsin P, 2005.

Link, Eric Carl. The Vast and Terrible Drama: American Literary Naturalism in the Late Nineteenth Century. Tuscaloosa, AL: U of Alabama P, 2004.

Lye, Colleen. “American Naturalism and Asiatic Racial Form: Frank Norris’s the Octopus and Moran of the ‘Lady Letty’.” Representations 84 (2004): 73-99.

Martin, Ronald E. American Literature and the Universe of Force. Durham: Duke University Press, 1981.

Michaels, Walter Benn. The Gold Standard and the Logic of Naturalism: American Literature at the Turn of the Century. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1987.

Mitchell, Lee Clark. Determined Fictions: American Literary Naturalism. New York: Columbia University Press, 1989.

Moglen, Seth. Mourning Modernity: Literary Modernism and the Injuries of American Capitalism. Stanford, CA: Stanford UP, 2007.

Papke, Mary E., ed.  Twisted from the Ordinary: Essays on American Literary Naturalism.  Knoxville: U of Tennessee P, 2003.

Parrington, V. L. The Beginnings of Critical Realism in America, 1860-1920. Vol. 3 of Main Currents in American Thought. New York: Harcourt, Brace, 1930.

Pease, Donald E. “Psychoanalyzing the Narrative Logics of Naturalism: The Call of the Wild.” Journal of Modern Literature 25.3-4 (2002): 14-39.

Perkovich, Mike. Nature Boys: Camp Discourse in American Literature from Whitman to Wharton. NY: Peter Lang, 2003.

Pizer, Donald. “`True Art Speaks Plainly’: Theodore Dreiser and the Late Nineteenth Century American Debate over Realism and Naturalism.” Nineteenth Century Prose. 23. 2 (Fall 1996): 76+.

Pizer, Donald. Realism and Naturalism in Nineteenth-Century American Literature. Revised Edition. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1984.

Pizer, Donald. The Theory and Practice of American Literary Naturalism: Selected Essays and Reviews. Southern Illinois University Press, 1993.

Pizer, Donald, ed. The Cambridge Companion to Realism and Naturalism: Howells to London. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1995.

Pizer, Donald, ed. Documents of American Realism and Naturalism. Carbondale and Edwardsville: Southern Illinois University Press, 1998.

Pizer, Donald, and Harbert, Earl, eds. American Realists and Naturalists. Vol. 12 of Dictionary of Literary Biography. Detroit: Gale Research, 1982.

Pizer, Donald. “Is American Literary Naturalism Dead? A Further Inquiry.” Twisted from the Ordinary: Essays on American Literary Naturalism. Ed. Mary E. Papke. Tennessee Studies in Literature (Tstl) Number: 40: U of Tennessee P, Knoxville, TN Pagination: 390-404, 2003. xv, 416.

Quirk, Tom, and Gary Scharnhorst, eds. American Realism and the Canon. Newark: University of Delaware Press, 1994.

Rosk, Nancy Von. “Coon Shows, Ragtime, and the Blues: Race, Urban Culture, and the Naturalist Vision in Paul Laurence Dunbar’s the Sport of the Gods.” Twisted from the Ordinary: Essays on American Literary Naturalism. Ed. Mary E. Papke. Tennessee Studies in Literature (Tstl) Number: 40: U of Tennessee P, Knoxville, TN Pagination: 144-68, 2003. xv, 416.

Seamon, Roger.  “Naturalist Narratives and the Ideational Context: A Theory of American Naturalist Fiction.” Canadian Review of American Studies 19 (1988): 47-64.

Schierenbeck, Daniel. “Is There a Doctor in the House? Norris’s Naturalist Gaze of Clinical Observation in Mcteague.” Twisted from the Ordinary: Essays on American Literary Naturalism. Ed. Mary E. Papke. Tennessee Studies in Literature (Tstl) Number: 40: U of Tennessee P, Knoxville, TN Pagination: 63-85, 2003. xv, 416.

Schmitz, Neil. “Naturalism Undone.” American Literary History 1.4 (Winter 1989): 897+.

Schor, Naomi. Breaking The Chain: Women, Theory, And French Realist Fiction. New York : Columbia University Press, 1985.

Seltzer, Mark. Bodies and Machines. New York: Routledge, 1992.

Spencer, Nicholas. After Utopia: The Rise of Critical Space in Twentieth-Century American Fiction. Lincoln: U of Nebraska P, 2006.

Stein, Linda L. Literary Research and the American Realism and Naturalism Period: Strategies and Sources.Lanham, MD: Scarecrow, 2009.

Studies In American Fiction 22.2 (Fall 1994). Special issue on “The Genders of Naturalism.”

Sundquist, Eric. American Realism: New Essays. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins, 1982.

Trachtenberg, Alan.  The Incorporation of America: Culture and Society in the Gilded Age. New York: Hill and Wang, 1982.

Walcutt, Charles Child. American Literary Naturalism: A Divided Stream. Minneapolis: University Minnesota Press, 1956.

Walker, Nancy A. “Women Writers and Literary Naturalism: The Case of Ellen Glasgow.” American Literary Realism 18 (1985): 133-146.

Wilson, Christopher. The Labor of Words: Literary Professionalism in the Progressive Era. Athens: Univ. of Georgia Press, 1985.

Zayani, Mohamed. “From Determinism to Indeterminacy: Chaos Theory, Systems Theory, and the Discourse of Naturalism.” Twisted from the Ordinary: Essays on American Literary Naturalism. Ed. Mary E. Papke. Tennessee Studies in Literature (Tstl) Number: 40: U of Tennessee P, Knoxville, TN Pagination: 345-66, 2003. xv, 416.

Zayani, Mohamed, and Jean-Joseph Goux. Reading the Symptom: Frank Norris, Theodore Dreiser, and the Dynamics of Capitalism. NY: Peter Lang, 1999.

Ziff, Larzer. The American 1890s: Life and Times of a Lost Generation. New York: Viking Press, 1966.

 

Comments

  1. thawks - September 19 @ 9:27 pm

    I think you are right in the sense that if we treat Victor’s situation as a real life problem many of us would run just as Victor did. The common human response is to run from our problems and only face them when absolutely necessary, such as when Victor met the creature on the mountain. I question whether this cowardly character was put in to portray a message to her peers or just do to the fact that it is a relatable human trait and is something that will stay true from generation to generation.

  2. thawks - September 19 @ 9:32 pm

    I agree with you that if we were to equate Victor’s problem to our everyday problems or actually put ourselves in his position most would run just the same. This is due to human natures “fight or flight” most would rather put off their problems until they are forced to confront them as Victor was when he saw his creation on the mountain. In terms of the reasoning behind portraying Victor’s character as a cowardly being I don’t know if this was done to send a message or if it was because she knew this reaction would stand the test of time and be something readers could relate to.

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